The Language of Art: The Art of Seeing. (Part 2: The Principles of Design)

October 7, 2016

In Part 2 of The Language of Art, we discuss how to recombine the Elements of Art into an analysis of the Principles of Design.  This podcast explains why we study great works of art and design as part of aiding us in our perceptual abilities.  Understanding how to exercise our descriptive and analytical skills results in a greater capacity to perceive the world around us.  With practice, this process becomes internalized, intuitive and second nature.  By studying, describing and analyzing works of art and design, we become more keenly attuned as artists and designers ourselves. 

  • Balance
  • Contrast
  • Movement
  • Emphasis
  • Rhythm and Pattern
  • Scale or Proportion
  • Unity or Variety

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

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A Conversation between Art Historians: Why do we study art history? (Part II)

July 22, 2016

All students at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online are required to complete a number of General Education courses.  This includes courses in Art History.  In Part II of this podcast, I continue the conversation with Art Institute of Pittsburgh Assistant Online Program Director Christina Kotoske to consider why this is beneficial to students in the Creative Arts.  No art or design exists in a vacuum.  Every artist or designer is influenced in some way or another by those who have come before them.   The more exposure we have to the history of art, the more we are able to incorporate diverse ideas and techniques into our own creative process.  We can think of this with a musical analogy. Contemporary DJs who “sample” parts of existing recordings rely on large collections to draw on for the creation of something new and novel.  By studying and listening to this musical history, the DJ can tap into a virtually endless reservoir of raw material.  The same idea applies to visual arts and design.

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

Artists/Movements discussed:
Marcel Duchamp (Dada)
Otto Dix (German Expressionism/New Objectivity)

Jackson Pollock (Abstract Expressionism)
Postmodernism

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A Conversation between Art Historians: Why do we study art history? (Part I)

July 15, 2016

All students at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online are required to complete a number of General Education courses.  This includes courses in Art History.  In Part I of this podcast, I will talk with Assistant Online Program Director Christina Kotoske to consider why this is beneficial to students in the Creative Arts.  No art or design exists in a vacuum.  Every artist or designer is influenced in some way or another by those who have come before them.   The more exposure we have to the history of art, the more we are able to incorporate diverse ideas and techniques into our own creative process.  We can think of this with a musical analogy. Contemporary DJs who “sample” parts of existing recordings rely on large collections to draw on for the creation of something new and novel.  By studying and listening to this musical history, the DJ can tap into a virtually endless reservoir of raw material.  The same idea applies to visual arts and design.

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

Artists/Movements discussed:
Marcel Duchamp (Dada)
Otto Dix (German Expressionism/New Objectivity)

Jackson Pollock (Abstract Expressionism)
Postmodernism

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