The Language of Art: The Art of Seeing. (Part 2: The Principles of Design)

October 7, 2016

In Part 2 of The Language of Art, we discuss how to recombine the Elements of Art into an analysis of the Principles of Design.  This podcast explains why we study great works of art and design as part of aiding us in our perceptual abilities.  Understanding how to exercise our descriptive and analytical skills results in a greater capacity to perceive the world around us.  With practice, this process becomes internalized, intuitive and second nature.  By studying, describing and analyzing works of art and design, we become more keenly attuned as artists and designers ourselves. 

  • Balance
  • Contrast
  • Movement
  • Emphasis
  • Rhythm and Pattern
  • Scale or Proportion
  • Unity or Variety

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

00:0000:00

The Language of Art: The Art of Seeing. (Part 1: The Elements of Art)

September 30, 2016

In this first of a two part podcast, we discuss in depth the advantages of learning the Language of Visual Arts.  Just as with music, we need to know how individual elements are used and combined to create a finished whole.  We cover the Elements of Art in detail,providing a rationale for why breaking done a work of art or design into individual elements is a necessary first step for presenting a visual description that establishes a foundation for synthesizing a formal analysis of a work of art or design.  We emphasize the process of deconstructing artworks, which will segue into the second podcast covering the Principles of Design.

  • Line
  • Value
  • Shape
  • Form
  • Space
  • Color
  • Texture

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

00:0000:00

A Conversation between Art Historians: Why do we study art history? (Part II)

July 22, 2016

All students at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online are required to complete a number of General Education courses.  This includes courses in Art History.  In Part II of this podcast, I continue the conversation with Art Institute of Pittsburgh Assistant Online Program Director Christina Kotoske to consider why this is beneficial to students in the Creative Arts.  No art or design exists in a vacuum.  Every artist or designer is influenced in some way or another by those who have come before them.   The more exposure we have to the history of art, the more we are able to incorporate diverse ideas and techniques into our own creative process.  We can think of this with a musical analogy. Contemporary DJs who “sample” parts of existing recordings rely on large collections to draw on for the creation of something new and novel.  By studying and listening to this musical history, the DJ can tap into a virtually endless reservoir of raw material.  The same idea applies to visual arts and design.

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

Artists/Movements discussed:
Marcel Duchamp (Dada)
Otto Dix (German Expressionism/New Objectivity)

Jackson Pollock (Abstract Expressionism)
Postmodernism

00:0000:00

A Conversation between Art Historians: Why do we study art history? (Part I)

July 15, 2016

All students at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh Online are required to complete a number of General Education courses.  This includes courses in Art History.  In Part I of this podcast, I will talk with Assistant Online Program Director Christina Kotoske to consider why this is beneficial to students in the Creative Arts.  No art or design exists in a vacuum.  Every artist or designer is influenced in some way or another by those who have come before them.   The more exposure we have to the history of art, the more we are able to incorporate diverse ideas and techniques into our own creative process.  We can think of this with a musical analogy. Contemporary DJs who “sample” parts of existing recordings rely on large collections to draw on for the creation of something new and novel.  By studying and listening to this musical history, the DJ can tap into a virtually endless reservoir of raw material.  The same idea applies to visual arts and design.

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

Artists/Movements discussed:
Marcel Duchamp (Dada)
Otto Dix (German Expressionism/New Objectivity)

Jackson Pollock (Abstract Expressionism)
Postmodernism

00:0000:00

This is a test of the Emergency Backup System: Do you have a “disaster plan”?

May 27, 2016

All of us will at some point have some kind of emergency that prevents us from gaining access to the classroom or completing work on time.  From inclement weather, power outages and service disruptions, to travel delays,family crises, and computer or hard drive failures, it is inevitable that we will all face hurdles that may cause us to fall behind.  In this podcast we will explore some ways to prepare a “disaster plan” to help mitigate unexpected challenges that may arise.

  1. Print Out important contact information
  2. Back Up all work in progress and once complete
  3. Identify alternative internet access points
  4. Prevent shutoffs or disruptions of services
  5. Protect equipment and information

Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

00:0000:00

Sharing your Portfolio on the Internet

March 25, 2016

You have probably seen “Your Portfolio Starts Now” in your classrooms, but what does it mean and why should you do it? 

      In this podcast, Jeremy Hockett speaks with Full-time Faculty member Nancy Zeller about the importance of beginning a portfolio early on in ones studies.  We discuss setting up an account to store and share your portfolio, and why it is a beneficial tool both while attending and after graduating from school.  We explore some of the options students have for the hosting of portfolio material.  Nancy Zeller explains how she has used such resources in her own professional career.  How might a professional online portfolio foster meaningful networking and productive "marketing"? What should one include in a portfolio? Ultimately, for students in the arts, a professional portfolio is a “visual resume” that documents the skills and creativity of an artist or designer.  It is perhaps the most important element of success in your field.

      Link: www.behance.net

      Contributor: Jeremy Hockett

00:0000:00